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In New Jersey, an inventive way to save Thomas Edison’s battery factory

(CNN)This is a building that refuses to go down without a fight.

In 1914, a massive fire raged through inventor Thomas Edison’s lab complex in downtown West Orange, New Jersey. Chemical-fueled flames shot 100 feet in the sky, burning five city blocks and destroying almost his entire operation.
Edison watched firemen fight the inferno from neighboring Building Number 5, better known as the Battery Factory, which made millions of batteries for experimental vehicles like submarines and electric cars. Built with his durable Edison Cement, the Battery Factory miraculously escaped damage.
    “As one of the millions of your admirers, I send you my sympathy,” rival inventor Nikola Tesla telegraphed him. “It is not only a personal and national loss, but a world loss, for you have been one of its greatest benefactors.”
    The 67-year-old Edison calmly declared, “I’ll start all over again tomorrow.”
    In true Edison fashion, disaster led directly to innovation: The man with 1,093 different patents to his name — from a viable lightbulb to the phonograph to the motion picture camera — noticed firefighters had trouble seeing in the smoky darkness, and two days later had invented a powerful battery-powered searchlight.
    Edison rebuilt his entire operation, but after his death in 1931, his business empire slowly crumbled and buildings went vacant. After decades of decline, a different kind of fire tore through Edison’s complex on Main Street: the drive for urban renewal.

    ‘This one can stay’

    Robert Parisi lived next door to the Edison buildings and remembers watching them go in 1974.
    “My father got us out of bed early to watch the implosions,” describes Parisi, now mayor of West Orange. “We local kids climbed through the rubble for days, collecting souvenirs like old Edison wax cylinders.”
    As for the Battery Factory, the story goes that the wrecking ball smashed into it three times; three times it bounced back off the durable Edison Cement.
    “So they decided, ‘This one can stay,'” says Eugene Diaz, principal at Prism Partners, the developers who now own the property.
    Although various businesses rented small portions of the massive building over the years (including wine storage for Daniel Boulud’s restaurants in New York), by 2003 the old Edison Battery Factory stood vacant and neglected, slowly crumbling, walled off from the surrounding streets by a high fence and an even higher jungle of weeds.
    That’s how it has sat for 13 years, as developers waited out the economic downturn and legal battles over proposed redevelopment.
    “The vast majority of park visitors pass that when they come to the park, which doesn’t present a good first impression,” admits Tom Ross, superintendent of the Thomas Edison National Historical Park, which preserves Edison’s main laboratory next door.
    Closed for its own extensive five-year renovation, Edison NHP reopened in 2009 with thousands of square feet of beautiful new exhibits and lab space on two full floors previously closed to the public — with a hulking symbol of industrial decline next door. (When Jack Welch, chairman of the capital campaign to invest tens of millions of dollars in the park’s renovation, brought then-first lady Hillary Clinton here, they embarrassingly stood in the shadow of the crumbling Battery Factory.)
    “It’s a huge eyesore right in the middle of our downtown,” Parisi admits.

    A space between preservation and development

    But Thomas Edison’s legacy of turning obstacles into innovation lives on, as the building could now become a symbol of collaboration between two adversaries stereotypically pitted against each other as fiercely as Edison and Tesla: developers and the National Park Service.
    The key is a concept called “adaptive reuse,” a sort of middle-ground compromise between historical preservation and redevelopment. Although Edison’s last remaining factory is designated a State and National Historic Landmark, it’s not part of the national park.
    “Any developers who were interested told us it was much more economical if they could just knock it down and start from scratch,” says Parisi. “But it’s our history here, and an important part of our country’s history. No one in town wants to see that happen.”
    “And of course these refurbished warehouses are now all the rage in real estate,” he says.
    Prism Partners deliberately avoided taking federal tax credits that would make them beholden to historic preservation restrictions, instead consulting with the neighboring Edison National Historical Park and local West Orange Historical Commission to determine appropriate choices like paint color and window styles.
    “We’re not beholden to all the historic requirements,” Diaz explains, “but the work is being done in a way that conforms significantly to what the federal government would require if we’d done a full historic renovation under federal guidelines.”
    Although preservationists have cringed at putting that power in the hands of a developer, to park superintendent Ross, it was a good compromise for an otherwise vacant building and one that he’s seen work firsthand.
    “It’s something we’ve seen with historic factory buildings in the Northeast, particularly in Lowell and New Bedford, Massachusetts, where I grew up,” says Ross. “There it’s been an excellent way to save, historically rehabilitate and reuse old buildings. You can already see the revitalization and rebirth.”
    “Sustainability, recycling, reuse — that’s an important part of our ethic and broader mission at the Park Service,” Ross says. “Giving historic structures a shot to be adaptively reused is good stewardship, good for the environment and good for historic preservation.”

    Finding a new use for history

    Thanks to its proximity to New York City, West Orange is a town with a deep history.
    It’s got ties from the Revolutionary era (of course Washington was here, and Aaron Burr later fled to friends here after his infamous duel with Alexander Hamilton) to the Civil War (Union commander George McClellan moved here just before he ran against Abraham Lincoln for president in 1864) to famous sportsmen (the “grand old man of football” Amos Stagg), architects (Stanford White) and musicians (both Liberace and Carole King got their start here).
    But, by and large, those physical settings are all gone, except for that of the town’s most famous son, Thomas Edison.
    “If the Battery Factory had been removed like the others, it would have wiped away chapters of our history,” says Joe Fagan, town historian and author of four books about West Orange.
    Now underway, Prism’s $230 million plan for “Edison Village” will convert the 400,000-square-foot building into 330 apartments plus 18,500 square feet of retail space, along with public areas featuring historic artifacts and exhibits about Thomas Edison, then start on similar development over the surrounding 21 acres that once made up the larger complex.
    Among the Battery Factory’s unique features (beyond the dense Edison Cement, which Diaz charitably describes as “challenging”) are 14-to-16-foot ceilings and 10-foot windows.
    “You’d never build a new building like that,” Diaz admits. And that unique historic pedigree is his main selling point.
    “People have a very strong emotional connection to history. People will be able to have the same view Edison’s workers did 100 years ago. That history will be the appeal of this building.”
    The first phase is scheduled to open late next year welcome news to both Parisi and Ross.
    “It’s been a long and winding road,” Parisi says, “but this kind of investment on Main Street is great for our downtown. One project can spur others, and most importantly, spur the neighboring community to pick itself up.”
    “There’s no denying that this will certainly be a shot in the arm for Main Street and the park to have that rehabilitation next door,” Ross says.
    “In New Bedford, Sarah Delano famously said, ‘If you bulldoze your heritage, you become just anywhere.’ If you knock down the last remaining Edison factory building and put in another cookie-cutter strip mall, you will become just like any other place in America — you’ll lose your community character, a part of your soul.”

    Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/11/travel/thomas-edison-battery-factory-development/index.html


    There’s no need to walk to the train, if you live in this building. It comes to you.

    (CNN)This decade, the mantra in real estate has been people want to live near mass transit. Now it seems people want to live with the transit.

    Not only does the light rail passenger train pass through the 19-story residential building, it also has a transit stop there,. So apartment residents can just go to the sixth through eighth floors to hitch a ride.
    Chongqing, located in southeast China, is a sprawling metropolis packed with 49 million residents, so architects and city planners have gotten really creative in making transportation and residential projects coexist in China’s so-called “Mountain City.”

      Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/03/21/asia/china-train-building-trnd/index.html


      Never-ending honeymoon: In El Nido, a retreat built from romance

      (CNN)“Get dropped off at the road by Las Cabanas beach about four kilometers (2.5 miles) outside of El Nido Town.

      “Walk all the way to the end of the beach, then ask the people at the coconut stand for Mark and Camille’s house.”
      Those are the instructions to find The Birdhouse — a new jungle glamping retreat in El Nido, a remote corner of Palawan island in the southwestern Philippines.
        The hard-to-find address is the brainchild of Mark-Anthony and Camille Dimson Villaflor, who built The Birdhouse after traveling around the world on a 16-month-long honeymoon — documented on their blog 365 Travel Dates.
        Inspired by the couple’s transformative trip around the world, the rustic-luxe tents offer a romantic refuge for honeymooners and adventure travelers.

        A year-long honeymoon

        The Villaflors’ love story started in 2009 when they met through a friend.
        Two years later, Mark was down on one knee at the W Hong Kong, proposing to the tune of Train’s “Marry Me.”
        The pair legally wed two months later.
        “I moved from Singapore to Shanghai where Mark was working and we lived together for the first time,” says Camille Villaflor.
        “That first year was hard. We were fighting all the time.”
        A teacher at the time, Mark pitched his new wife a crazy idea: What if they took a year-long honeymoon?
        “It sounded like the coolest thing ever, how can you say no?” she recalls. “But we were doing well with money and had proper jobs … We were just going to leave all of that to go on a sabbatical?”

        Making it work

        It started with a trial run. The couple spent 40 days backpacking through Cambodia and western China.
        After the experience, the adventurous duo returned to Shanghai feeling refreshed.
        “We knew then that travel was our common ground,” remembers Camille, who is originally from Manila.
        “Instead of focusing on each other and our flaws, we were distracted by the amazing things we were seeing and we felt so grateful for the experiences.”
        Convinced that a year-long honeymoon was totally doable, the couple began saving for the trip.

        Taking off

        One week (or more) in this paradise. Big Lagoon, El Nido, Palawan. #travel #backpacking #365traveldates #banca #philippines #elnido #smartbrotrips #agodalens #tourismphl #wheninmanila

        A post shared by mark + camille villaflor (@365traveldates) on

        The couple took on several part-time jobs and worked weekends, investing 40-50% of their income each month towards the travel fund.
        Mark estimated they could get by on about $100 a day, or $3,000 a month.
        Once they had saved $30,000, the couple packed up two rucksacks — a 28-pound backpack for Camille and a 44-pound bag for Mark — and set out for the US to begin their journey.
        They took advantage of credit card travel promotions, collecting redeemable points and rewards. Mark estimates they opened 10 to 15 cards by the end of the trip.
        The couple also worked along the way, taking on everything from check-in services at hostels to social media management, design consultation, blog reviews — even mopping floors.
        “We had figured out blogging and social media by the fourth month or so, so we started pitching places — trading reviews and advertising for accommodations,” says Mark.

        Building the Birdhouse

        After 16 months abroad, Mark got a job offer in Austria.
        To arrange visas, the couple had to apply in their countries of residence.
        That meant flying to the US to take care of Mark’s passport and then over to Manila for Camille’s.
        While waiting for Camille’s visa to be approved, the couple ventured to El Nido — a pristine corner of the southwestern Philippines.
        Meaning “the nest” in Spanish, the remote beachside area is home to beautiful turquoise water and imposing limestone cliffs.
        They hosted travel workshops while scouting out potential real estate investments on the island.
        The couple could see that El Nido was due for a tourist boom.
        They came across a half-acre plot of wild jungle, set back from the beach on a mountain.

        The mighty jungle

        “The terrain was very thick,” remembers Camille. “Mark went up and took me up later and we fell in love with the view. We decided to buy it — it was a no-brainer. “
        They bought the land in November 2015 and began building in February 2016.
        “We had been unemployed for a year and a half, so we ended up selling a property in Manila to fund the construction,” says Mark.
        Coming off a year of liberating travel, it wasn’t the most glamorous transition.
        “We came from being totally free to working around-the-clock on construction,” remembers Camille.
        “We had no electricity except fireflies in our room. We had no running water. It was rainy season and we were collecting rainwater and using it to shower and everything.”
        “But we had a home,” Mark interjects.

        Enter the love nest

        Six months later The Birdhouse opened with three glamping tents — which the couple dubs “nests” — and a communal lodge overlooking Marimegmeg Beach.
        It’s so “off-the-beaten path” the couple had to build their own trail.
        From the aforementioned coconut stand, hand-drawn wooden markers pegged to tree trunks lead travelers over bamboo bridges and deeper into the jungle.
        After the short trek, a stairwell leads travelers up a steep mountainside where contemporary tents are visible between the tree branches.
        At the top, a treehouse-like lodge dubbed the “Mother Nest” triples as a lobby, restaurant and Mark and Camille’s home.
        Designed by Camille, the communal house has an eclectic vibe, featuring romantic hanging bamboo chairs, Moroccan-style rugs, a library of travel books and a ukulele.
        The couple’s cat lounges in the late afternoon sun, while guests enjoy a home-cooked meal and views of Bacuit Bay.
        Below the main lodge, each tent sits on a platform in the trees, with a small porch to take in the sea view and a night sky full of stars.
        Inside the canvas flaps, there’s a queen-size bed, a yellow carpet and locally made wooden furnishings.

        Keeping El Nido green

        But The Birdhouse aims to be more than just a unique getaway.
        The short-term goal? A completely self-sustainable restaurant and retreat.
        As for the bigger picture, Mark and Camille are in the process of introducing a waste-management nonprofit, with an aim to work with more hotels in the area and protect El Nido’s natural beauty amid an uptick in tourism.
        The municipal tourism office estimated that El Nido received 12,000 monthly arrivals in 2015 — up from 10,000 in 1994.
        “What normally happens in El Nido is that the waste management is viewed as an expense by hotels,” explains Shyo Sayajon, the retreat’s full-time permaculture designer.
        “Hotels transfer most of the expense to the local government, which is required to manage waste. Sadly, the local government doesn’t manage the waste effectively and ecologically.”
        A former government employee, Sayajon moved into the field to make a more direct impact on the environment.
        Sayajon has implemented several solutions at The Birdhouse so far, including composting, water recycling, natural water storage and organic gardening.
        “I don’t think El Nido has even started to boom. But it’s coming,” says Mark.
        “We want to present an eco-friendly lifestyle for other people and be an example for other hotels in El Nido to replicate.”

        Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/03/19/travel/honeymoon-bird-house-el-nido-philippines/index.html


        Montpellier in the spotlight: development mania in France’s fastest-growing city

        This sun-kissed city has just become Frances seventh largest on the back of students, biotech … and a lively skanking scene

        This compact, sun-kissed city of 275,000 people, located six miles inland from Frances Mediterranean coast, should be passing Strasbourg as the countrys seventh-biggest. Any time now.

        Often overlooked for the bigger southern metropolises of Toulouse and Nice, and even Provenal tourist-draws such as Avignon and Arles, Montpellier has been the fastest growing French city over the last half-century, more than doubling in size from only 119,000 in 1962.

        Growing pains

        Spend five minutes on 18th-century plaza Place de la Comdie, and youll feel the livening effects of the citys massive student intake, who comprise up to one-third of residents. But for some people, the growth has been too abrupt.

        My feeling is that the city has lost a bit of its soul, says Marie Laure Anselme-Martin, 70, from a local family going back four generations. There are very few Montpellirains with real roots only about 15% of the population now. You could put us all in the zoo.

        The citys journey from poky provincial capital started in the 1960s, when it was first swollen by the influx of pieds-noir (Christian and Jewish people whose families had migrated from all parts of the Mediterranean to French Algeria) and Spanish exiles from Franco. Enter outspoken socialist mayor Georges Frche. This frank mayor once declared he would name the municipalitys cleaning-supplies room after Franois Mitterand: Un ptit president, une petite salle. (A small president, a small room.) His development programme including the love-it-or-hate-it neoclassical Antigone quarter, and later the Jean Nouvel-designed town hall, a kind of black Rubiks cube made Montpellier Frances urbanist laboratory. Montpellier took off with him, says Anselme-Martin, even though she stood in opposition to Frche as a municipal councillor. When he arrived, the city raised the bar very high.

        City in numbers

        300 Annual days of sunshine.

        2,680 Species in the Jardin des Plantes, Frances oldest botanical gardens.

        82 Points with which Montpellier HSC did a Leicester and unexpectedly won the French football championship in 2011-12 for the sole time in their history. (Theyre currently mid-table.)

        37 Percentage of youth unemployment in the city testament to ongoing economic stagnation in the south, and Montpelliers reputation as a cushy beach-bum option.

        and pictures

        Theres a Lynchian frisson to Montpellier by night, according to photographer Yohann Gozard. His local nightscapes are currently showing at La Panace gallerys Retour sur Mulholland Drive exhibition.

        #sunset #montpellier #france

        A post shared by Laurena Stanos (@laurenastanos) on

        History in 100 words

        Unlike its illustrious neighbours, Montpellier has no Greek or Roman heritage. First mentioned in AD 985, it grew to prominence in the Middle Ages, thanks partly to a school of medicine that quickly became a European leader and is now the worlds oldest active medical faculty. Former pharmacist Anselme-Martin says Montpelliers research culture is one of its highlights: I bathed in it. Ive got lots of friends in the research world, theyre people I appreciate because theyre humble. Open-mindedness was key: in 1180, William VIII decreed that anyone, including Jews and Muslims, could practice in Montpellier though not apothecaries, as Nostradamus, expelled for being one, would learn. Today, the medico-botanical influence is still evident in the scores of biotech and agribusiness companies.

        Montpellier in sound and vision

        Profound late-career Truffaut or misogynist misstep, depending on who youre talking to, the great director let his wandering eye rove on Montpelliers streets for 1977s The Man Who Loved Women. Here is local directors Yann Sinics airborne tribute to the film.

        The Meds little-known skanking outpost, Montpellier has a vibrant roots-reggae scene dating back to the late 1990s. Since 2010, record label Salomon Heritage has taken the reins broadcasting the Jamaican sound system tradition to the Languedoc and further afield.

        Whats everyone talking about?

        Surprisingly for a small city, Montpellier has ranked high in recent studies of Frances most congested places, rivalling Marseille and Paris. Its less surprising when you look at the thick tangle of arterial roads and exurban sprawl surrounding it. Cutting a 12km scar through the red loam to the south of the city since 2014, is the massive A9 building site currently the countrys largest motorway construction project, designed to siphon off all non-commuter traffic and reroute it southwards.

        Whats next for the city?

        With real-estate development sprouting up on every side, Montpelliers mayor, Philippe Saurel, is still fixated on showy flagship projects. The Belaroia (jewel in Occitan) is a new luxury hotel and apartments complex expected to be completed opposite central Gare St Roch at the end of 2018, where a fifth tram line a new axis linking villages to the north and southwest may intersect by 2025.

        Then there is the flashy 55m LArbre Blanc tower, stylistically situated between Japan and the Mediterranean. Anselme-Martin has her doubts: These showcase buildings are they going to work? Can people afford this housing? Because Languedoc-Roussillon is nearly Frances poorest region. Not much work, a lot of unemployment.

        There are certainly signs of development mania. The overarching Occitan region recently withdraw its share of funding for a new 135m out-of-town train station already under construction, after learning that only four TGVs a day will stop there on its initial opening in 2018.

        With all this activity, one thing is sure: Nantes, Frances sixth biggest city with a population of about 285,000, is now in Montpelliers sights.

        Thomas Pesquet (@Thom_astro)

        Au tour de @montpellier_ davoir sa photo spatiale! Je crois bien avoir loup de peu la Grande-Motte et Palavas-les-Flots #Proxima pic.twitter.com/BpGbVAG2wr

        January 30, 2017

        Close zoom

        The lively but slightly-too-Saurel-friendly Gazette de Montpellier is the local Time Out. MontpellierCityCrunch is the buzziest events guide. The underground-orientated Jacker magazine is Montpelliers answer to the Beastie Boys Grand Royale.

        Follow Guardian Cities on Twitter and Facebook to join the discussion, and explore our archive here

        Read more: https://www.theguardian.com/cities/2017/mar/13/montpellier-spotlight-development-mania-france-fastest-growing-city


        9 ski resorts you can fly into

        (CNN)The freedom found skiing on a mountain is often earned after lengthy journeys, airport hassles and time-consuming traffic.

        But what if flying to the slopes was simple?
        Certain ski resorts do offer this — and not just the ones involving a helicopter lift from the nearest international airport.
        “The benefit of private jet travel for ski trips is as much about time saving and convenience, as it is about luxury,” says PrivateFly chief executive Adam Twidell.
          Here are nine of the best ski resorts that can by flown directly to, with airfields less than 10 miles from the ski lifts.

          Courchevel, France

          Pitkin

          Everyone’s heard of Aspen, the Colorado silver-boom mining town done good — so good, in fact, it’s an A-list favorite with some of the most expensive real estate in the United States.
          And its Pitkin County Airport is just a few short miles from the slopes.
          The airfield, which connects with dozens of US cities, is just three miles from the town of Aspen, surrounded by the ski area of Aspen Mountain (known locally as Ajax), Aspen Highlands and Buttermilk.
          Another ski area, Snowmass Village, is just six miles from the tarmac.
          Aspen, which features in several songs by late resident John Denver, claims a total of 319 miles of tree-lined Rocky Mountains trails.
          Common celebrity crash pads include the five-star Little Nell, Hotel Jerome and the St Regis.
          Did you know? Aspen’s Buttermilk hosts the Winter X Games, while the 2017 FIS alpine skiing World Cup finals will be held there in March.

          Revelstoke, Canada

          A check for $9,890 will buy a round-trip ticket on a private charter from Vancouver to Revelstoke deep in the heart of powder country.
          The airport — which also hosts two scheduled flights a week (via Revelstoke Air) is just two miles south of town.
          Be rewarded with a vertical drop of 5,620 feet — the most in North America — and 64 runs among glades and high-alpine bowls on Mount Mackenzie.
          Revelstoke is also known for its heli-skiing.
          From the uber-luxury Bighorn lodge, step onto a chopper parked out front and be whisked from doorstep to deep powder in minutes.
          Bighorn costs $79,160 for the lodge in a high-season week, excluding heli-skiing. The helicopter will clock up $1,223 per person, per day.
          Did you know? Don’t forget to pack a snorkel — Revelstoke is blessed with 40-60 feet of snow annually.

          Telluride, Colorado

          This former mining town from the mid-1800s was the setting for Butch Cassidy’s first bank heist in 1889, but now Telluride rates as one of North America’s hottest ski locations.
          Telluride Regional Airport sits on a lofty plateau six miles west of town and is open to scheduled services via Great Lakes Airlines or private charters.
          This makes it possible to fly in and be cruising in the San Juan mountains within the hour.
          Telluride’s compact center, only eight blocks wide and 12 long, retains a boutique Wild West look with clapboard storefronts and Victorian-era homes.
          Famous residents have included Tom Cruise, Jerry Seinfeld and Oprah Winfrey.
          The ski area — 2,000 acres and 127 runs among aspen and spruce glades — is dominated by Palmyra Peak at 13,320 feet.
          The Revelation lift whisks skiers up to a high point of 12,515 feet above Revelation bowl.
          Did you know? The ski area at Telluride — thought to be a contraction of the phrase “To hell you ride” — was founded in 1970 with snowcat skiing for $12.50 a day including a sack lunch. The first lifts followed in 1972.

          Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/20/travel/ski-resorts-you-can-fly-into/index.html


          Alpine airports: Ski resorts you can fly into

          (CNN)The freedom found skiing on a mountain is often earned after lengthy journeys, airport hassles and time-consuming traffic.

          But what if flying to the slopes was simple?
          Certain ski resorts do offer this — and not just the ones involving a helicopter lift from the nearest international airport.
          “The benefit of private jet travel for ski trips is as much about time saving and convenience, as it is about luxury,” says PrivateFly chief executive Adam Twidell.
            Here are nine of the best ski resorts that can by flown directly to, with airfields less than 10 miles from the ski lifts.

            Courchevel, France

            Pitkin

            Everyone’s heard of Aspen, the Colorado silver-boom mining town done good — so good, in fact, it’s an A-list favorite with some of the most expensive real estate in the United States.
            And its Pitkin County Airport is just a few short miles from the slopes.
            The airfield, which connects with dozens of US cities, is just three miles from the town of Aspen, surrounded by the ski area of Aspen Mountain (known locally as Ajax), Aspen Highlands and Buttermilk.
            Another ski area, Snowmass Village, is just six miles from the tarmac.
            Aspen, which features in several songs by late resident John Denver, claims a total of 319 miles of tree-lined Rocky Mountains trails.
            Common celebrity crash pads include the five-star Little Nell, Hotel Jerome and the St Regis.
            Did you know? Aspen’s Buttermilk hosts the Winter X Games, while the 2017 FIS alpine skiing World Cup finals will be held there in March.

            Revelstoke, Canada

            A check for $9,890 will buy a round-trip ticket on a private charter from Vancouver to Revelstoke deep in the heart of powder country.
            The airport — which also hosts two scheduled flights a week (via Revelstoke Air) is just two miles south of town.
            Be rewarded with a vertical drop of 5,620 feet — the most in North America — and 64 runs among glades and high-alpine bowls on Mount Mackenzie.
            Revelstoke is also known for its heli-skiing.
            From the uber-luxury Bighorn lodge, step onto a chopper parked out front and be whisked from doorstep to deep powder in minutes.
            Bighorn costs $79,160 for the lodge in a high-season week, excluding heli-skiing. The helicopter will clock up $1,223 per person, per day.
            Did you know? Don’t forget to pack a snorkel — Revelstoke is blessed with 40-60 feet of snow annually.

            Telluride, Colorado

            This former mining town from the mid-1800s was the setting for Butch Cassidy’s first bank heist in 1889, but now Telluride rates as one of North America’s hottest ski locations.
            Telluride Regional Airport sits on a lofty plateau six miles west of town and is open to scheduled services via Great Lakes Airlines or private charters.
            This makes it possible to fly in and be cruising in the San Juan mountains within the hour.
            Telluride’s compact center, only eight blocks wide and 12 long, retains a boutique Wild West look with clapboard storefronts and Victorian-era homes.
            Famous residents have included Tom Cruise, Jerry Seinfeld and Oprah Winfrey.
            The ski area — 2,000 acres and 127 runs among aspen and spruce glades — is dominated by Palmyra Peak at 13,320 feet.
            The Revelation lift whisks skiers up to a high point of 12,515 feet above Revelation bowl.
            Did you know? The ski area at Telluride — thought to be a contraction of the phrase “To hell you ride” — was founded in 1970 with snowcat skiing for $12.50 a day including a sack lunch. The first lifts followed in 1972.

            Read more: http://www.cnn.com/2017/02/20/travel/ski-resorts-you-can-fly-into/index.html


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